CONAHEC News and Information

Jeudi, juin. 18, 2020

In the "Before Times," taking a gap year could mean backpacking with a group of recent grads, volunteering with an overseas aid organization or working in the offices of a company you admire. But COVID-19 has rendered many future plans impossible, at least for the time being. And as many colleges and universities across the country close their doors for the fall semester (still offering online learning options), students are weighing whether to take time off.

Jeudi, juin. 18, 2020

One thing the pandemic and ensuing economic slowdown has done is to make people rethink their finances and the value of big-ticket purchases. That includes the value of a traditional college degree. 

As the coronavirus pandemic swept the globe, 91% of all students worldwide saw their schools closed, according to UNESCO. In many cases classes continued virtually, putting an unexpected spotlight on online learning.

Jeudi, juin. 18, 2020
  • The pandemic has forced universities to bring their courses online.
  • This is just one step along the road to a new educational paradigm, however.
  • We can expect a new model to emerge once COVID-19 has passed.
Jeudi, juin. 18, 2020

COVID-19 puts higher-ed finances at risk. For some universities, revenue shortfalls are going to be a pain—for other universities the shortfall may be a disaster. Public universities face three major sources of revenue risk: hospital revenues, tuition (both from overall enrollment and with special attention to enrollment of out-of-state students), and state funding. The bottom line here is going to be that the exposure of different schools to these risks is extremely variable. When it comes to the financial consequences of COVID-19, there’s no one-size-fits-all impact.

Jeudi, juin. 11, 2020

When the noted particle theorist Alessandro Strumia gave a talk at CERN near Geneva in 2018, he raised a storm of protest by suggesting that women in his discipline were somehow less capable than men. In response, a collection of physicists who gave themselves the endearing name Particles for Justice came together to issue a statement condemning Strumia’s remarks.

Jeudi, juin. 11, 2020

When Divyansh Kaushik first came to the U.S., his goals were straightforward: to do computer-science research and earn his Ph.D. But over the past three years, he’s become more politically and socially active, first around science policy, and then on a broader swath of issues, including DACA, food insecurity, and optional practical training, the work program for international graduates. 

Mardi, mai. 26, 2020

 

INTRODUCTION

In December 2019, a viral outbreak of pneumonia of unknown origin occurred in Wuhan, China. On 9 January 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) officially announced the discovery of a novel coronavirus: SARS-Cov2. This new virus is the pathogen responsible for this infectious respiratory disease called COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease).

COVID-19 spread quickly around the world and was declared a pandemic by the WHO on

11 March 2020.

Mardi, mai. 26, 2020

In an open letter to a top Trump Administration official, 77 Nobel prize-winning American scientists say they are "gravely concerned" about the recent abrupt cancellation of a federal grant to a U.S. non-profit that was researching coronaviruses in China. The laureates say that the move, announced on April 24, "sets a dangerous precedent by interfering in the conduct of science" and "deprives the nation and the world of highly regarded science that could help control one of the greatest health crises in modern history and those that may arise in the future."

Vendredi, mai. 22, 2020

Right now, across the country, millions of high-school graduates and their families are facing an undeniable fact: The pandemic has thrown their plans for the future into complete disarray. Some of these families were hoping to send their kids to out-of-state institutions that are now barely operational. Others were hoping their kids would find jobs right out of high school, and those jobs are almost certainly gone now.

Vendredi, mai. 22, 2020

The coronavirus test wasn't as bad as Celeste Torres imagined. Standing outside a dorm at the University of California, San Diego, Torres stuck a swab up a nostril, scanned a QR code, and went on with the day.

"The process itself was about five minutes," Torres says, "I did cry a little bit just because it's, I guess, a natural reaction."

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