CONAHEC News and Information

Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019

A crucial analysis released Thursday reveals that the world’s oceans are not only warming but also that their rate of warming is accelerating — a lot faster than we thought. In the Science paper, newly available data on ocean heat demonstrates that since the ‘60s, ocean warming has been stronger and more consistent than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change previously reported. The consequences, scientists say, will be severe and long-lasting, but human action can still mitigate how bad the outcome will be.

Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019

JAKE ANDEREGG, THE Utah state senator representing Salt Lake City and Provo, didn’t actually mean to fight climate change. It was sort of an accident. As in a lot of places in the US, housing in Anderegg’s district is growing scarce and more expensive. So he’s pushing a proposal that would inject money into loans for constructing more housing, especially near transit corridors.

Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019

Governments and businesses habitually set out emergency response plans to protect their economies, jobs, cities and other crucial assets from potential disaster. Yet when it comes to climate change ― the biggest, most urgent threat the world faces ― there is no emergency plan.

On the issue of our lifetime, countries can agree very little. The World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report 2019 published last Tuesday found that increasing divisions between the world’s major powers is the most urgent global risk we face because it stymies vital collective action on climate change.

Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019

Well deserved recognition of Santiago Castiello, recipient of the Association for International Education Administrators (AIEA) Harold Josephson Award for professional promise in international education.  A student in the PhD program offered by the University of Arizona’s Center for the study of Higher Education, Santiago has also managed CONAHEC’s Mobility Programs and other initiatives during his time as an international student while publishing extensively on topics of importance in our field.  We’re very proud of your accomplishment and thankful to have you with us. 

Friday, Jan. 18, 2019

Environmentalists have identified another threat to the planet. It’s called a nurdle.

Nurdles are tiny pellets of plastic resin no bigger than a pencil eraser that manufacturers transform into packaging, plastic straws, water bottles and other typical targets of environmental action.

Friday, Jan. 18, 2019

In 2016, Royal Dutch Shell PLC, one of the largest oil and gas companies in the world, started a historic plunge into new businesses.

The British-Dutch-controlled company began spending $2 billion a year on joint ventures that had little or nothing to do with oil and gas. One of its new companies sells biofuels made from sugar cane in Brazil. Another built an advanced demonstration project in Bangalore, India, that makes biofuels from agricultural wastes.

Friday, Jan. 18, 2019

There may actually be a way to keep the worst of climate change at bay, but it's going to take a herculean effort, according to a new study published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications.

Climate change is well underway already, the time to act and limit its human causes is now, many studies have shown. This latest report maps out what it may take to get there.

Friday, Jan. 18, 2019

Earth’s oceans are warmer now than at any point since humans started systematically tracking their temperatures, according to research published on January 16 in Advances in Atmospheric Sciences. The oceans have sopped up more than 90 percent of the heat trapped by human-emitted greenhouse gases, slowing the warming of the atmosphere—but causing many other unwelcome changes to the planet’s climate.

Friday, Dec. 21, 2018

International students are arriving on Canadian shores in record numbers. In recent years, they have been “pouring” into Canadian universities while old favourites in the English-speaking world, like the US and the UK, are seeing the opposite trend. Canada is now the go-to study abroad destination for its friendly immigration policies and welcoming stance towards foreigners.

Once students graduate, however, it’s no longer the fairytale it seems.

Friday, Dec. 21, 2018

Egypt’s Ministry of Education announced on Saturday plans to work with the United Arab Emirates and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to establish the world’s largest digital library, reports Egypt Independent.

The Ministry’s Media Advisor, Ahmed Sabry, added that that the announcement was made by all three countries at the Knowledge Summit 2018, which took place in Dubai on December 5-6.

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